Not long ago.
Not far away.

Admission

  • Union Station Members $15*
  • Adults $23.50*
  • Students (Ages 3-22) $17.50*
  • Senior (Ages 55+) $19*
  • Group Admission $15*
  • *$1.50 fee is added to each ticket to ensure the ongoing preservation of Union Station.
  • Children age 2 and under do not require a ticket.

Opening June 14, 2021

  • Mon-Sun 10am-6pm
  • Last tickets sold 4pm
  • Photo Policy: Non-flash photo for personal use only. Most importantly, please avoid any attitude, reference or expression that could be considered disrespectful to the memory of Holocaust victims.

An International Exhibition of Unprecedented Importance. A Story to Shake the Conscience of the World.

This groundbreaking exhibition brings together more than 700 original objects and 400 photographs from over 20 institutions and museums around the world. Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. is the most comprehensive exhibition dedicated to the history of Auschwitz and its role in the Holocaust ever presented in North America, and an unparalleled opportunity to confront the singular face of human evil—one that arose not long ago and not far away.

Location
Bank of America Gallery located within Union Station
Type
Educational Historical
Recommended Age Range
12 & Older
Plan For Your Experience
• No Strollers
• No bags
• No food/drink/gum
• Limit phone usage
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Overnight Accommodations

The Westin Kansas City at Crown Center is connected to Union Station by the enclosed walkway called the Link. Located in the middle of Crown Center, the Westin provides access to multiple restaurants and activities, and easy access to the Kansas City Streetcar.  And as the official hotel sponsor for Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away., the Westin Kansas City at Crown Center is pleased to offer special packaged savings that includes FREE Parking and Internet (a $25 value) and nightly savings of between 10-15%, depending on the day of your visit

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The Exhibition

For the first time, 75 years after the liberation of Auschwitz, a touring exhibition dedicated to the historical significance of the camp is being presented to a U.S. audience.

Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. opening in Kansas City June 2021 after the exhibition closes at New York’s Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. The exhibition explores the dual identity of the camp as a physical location—the largest documented mass murder site in human history—and as a symbol of the borderless manifestation of hatred and human barbarity.

Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. was conceived by Musealia and the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum and curated by an international panel of experts, including world-renowned scholars Dr. Robert Jan van Pelt, Dr. Michael Berenbaum, and Paul Salmons, in an unprecedented collaboration with historians and curators at the Research Center at the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, led by Dr. Piotr Setkiewicz.

The exhibition features artifacts and materials—never before seen in North America—on loan from more than 20 institutions and private collections around the world. In addition to the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum and the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, participating institutions include Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, Auschwitz Jewish Center in Oświęcim, the Memorial and Museum Sachsenhausen in Oranienburg, and the Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide in London.

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Speaker Series

Union Station Kansas City and The Midwest Center for Holocaust Education are pleased to present the following educational programs associated with the exhibition Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away.

Tim Cole – Holocaust Landscapes

Andrew Bergerson – Collapsing Democracy, Rising Fascism

Fran Sternberg – “Cities of boundless possibilities”: Polish Jewry Between The Wars

Gerhard Baumgartner – The Roma Experience of the Holocaust

Anna Hájková – Terezin & Deportations from the West

David Marwell – Mengele: Unmasking the “Angel of Death”

Beth Griech-Polelle – Hitler’s First Victims: The Nazi Forced Sterilization Program and the Euthanasia Project

Non-Jewish Victims of the Holocaust: A Panel

Shelly Cline – Belzec to Auschwitz

Holly Huffnagle – 75 Years After Auschwitz: Antisemitism in America

William Spurlin – Queering Holocaust Studies

Sam Kassow – Times Capsules Under the Rubble: the Ringelblum Archive in the Warsaw Ghetto

Lawrence Douglas – From Nuremberg to Demjanjuk: Justice and the Trials of the Holocaust – Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration

Caroline Sturdy Colls – Archaeology of the Holocaust: Treblinka and Bergen-Belsen

Our Mothers Were in Auschwitz – Three Daughters Remember

Robert Jan van Pelt – Auschwitz

Paul Salmons

Tim Cole – Holocaust Landscapes

Camps like Auschwitz were only one of the many landscapes where the Holocaust was enacted and experienced. In this talk, Dr. Cole situates the place of Auschwitz within the wider geography and chronology of a genocide that was constantly on the move as it first moved east, and then west, and then east again across Europe.

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Andrew Bergerson – Collapsing Democracy, Rising Fascism

Every Jewish person murdered in Auschwitz-Birkenau had been friends or neighbors with at least some non-Jewish people at one time. This talk will take a step back to the communities in which Jews lived before deportation or Nazi occupation. It will explore the topic of violence among people who had previously coexisted in a civil society. How did friends and neighbors turn into Aryans and Jews? Why did some communities begin killing their Jewish neighbors? What made others more resilient, such that they did not join in these mass atrocities? How might we build those more resilient communities?

Dr. Bergerson a professor of History and Public Humanities at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. He is a historian of modern Germany with particular interest in the history of everyday life (Alltagsgeschichte), ethnographic/oral history, interdisciplinary German studies, and the public humanities. He teaches a range of courses on modern German, modern European, and modern global history. He has authored or coauthored various monographs including: Ordinary Germans in Extraordinary Times,  The Happy Burden of History, and Ruptures in the Everyday.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

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Fran Sternberg – “Cities of boundless possibilities”: Polish Jewry Between The Wars

On the eve of the Holocaust, Polish Jewry – Europe’s largest Jewish community and most of American and Israeli Jewry’s historic “heartland” – was a vital and dynamic society: a forward looking “brave new world” filled with potential, brimming with life, and caught up in and grappling with a process of transformation that was informed not only by old tensions and conflicts, but also by new attitudes and institutions and , above all, by new relationships with the wider world.

Dr. Sternberg is affiliated with the University of Kansas Jewish Studies Program, where she teaches a range of Jewish history courses – among them, modern Jewish History, medieval and early modern Jewry, the Holocaust, Hitler and Nazi Germany and the history of Jewish women.  Her research and areas of interest include 19th and 20th century East European Jewry, interwar Polish Jewry, the shtetl, antisemitism, and the Holocaust.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

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Gerhard Baumgartner – The Roma Experience of the Holocaust

Dr. Baumgartner is Director of the Documentation Centre of the Austrian Resistance.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

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Anna Hájková – Terezin & Deportations from the West

Terezín was operated by the Nazis between November 1941 and May 1945 as a transit ghetto for Central and Western European Jews before their deportation for murder in the East. The Last Ghetto offers both a modern history of this Central European ghetto and the first in-depth analytical history of a prison society during the Holocaust. During the three and a half years of the camp’s existence, prisoners created their own culture and habits, bonded, fell in love, and forged new families. Based on extensive archival research in nine languages and on empathetic reading of victim testimonies, The Last Ghetto casts light on human society works in extremis.

Dr. Anna Hájková, Associate Professor of Modern Continental European History, University of Warwick, is the author of The Last Ghetto: An Everyday History of Theresienstadt. Awarded the Irma Rosenberg and Herbert Steiner Prizes, the book focuses on the everyday history of the Holocaust, using the Terezín transit ghetto as a springboard to examine larger issues of human behavior under extreme stress. Her work examines the society in the camps, Jewish social and political elites, issues of nationalism and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and the Jewish Councils.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

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David Marwell – Mengele: Unmasking the “Angel of Death”

Beth Griech-Polelle – Hitler’s First Victims: The Nazi Forced Sterilization Program and the Euthanasia Project

Non-Jewish Victims of the Holocaust: A Panel

Nearly 5 million non-Jews were murdered in the course of the Holocaust. This panel will explore the experiences of three of those victim groups – the Roma, queer victims, and the mentally and physically disabled. Gerhard Baumgartner, William Spurlin, and Beth Griech-Pollele will fill this panel and each will give an individual presentation on a separate date.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

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Shelly Cline – Belzec to Auschwitz

Holly Huffnagle – 75 Years After Auschwitz: Antisemitism in America

William Spurlin – Queering Holocaust Studies

Professor Spurlin is Professor of English and Vice-Dean/Education in the College of Business, Arts & Social Sciences, Brunel University London. He has written extensively on the politics of gender and sexual dissidence and is widely known for his work in queer studies. His monograph, Lost Intimacies: Rethinking Homosexuality under National Socialism (2009), uses queer theory to read against the grain of hetero-textual narratives of the Holocaust and as a way for locating sexuality at its intersections with race, gender, and eugenics within the National Socialist imaginary.  His book also challenges prevailing assumptions in the received scholarship that lesbians were not as systematically persecuted by the Nazis.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.


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Sam Kassow – Times Capsules Under the Rubble: the Ringelblum Archive in the Warsaw Ghetto

Lawrence Douglas – From Nuremberg to Demjanjuk: Justice and the Trials of the Holocaust – Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration

Caroline Sturdy Colls – Archaeology of the Holocaust: Treblinka and Bergen-Belsen

Dr. Sturdy Colls will present on her research as an archaeologist at the sites of Treblinka and Bergen-Belsen.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

Register

Our Mothers Were in Auschwitz – Three Daughters Remember

Robert Jan van Pelt – Auschwitz

Paul Salmons

Paul Salmons is consultant to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Chief Curator of ‘Seeing Auschwitz’, an exhibition by Musealia for the United Nations and UNESCO. Being an independent curator and educator specializing in difficult histories, Salmons helped create the United Kingdom’s national Holocaust Exhibition at the Imperial War Museum; co-founded the Centre for Holocaust Education at University College London; and played a leading role in the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, an inter-governmental body of more than 30 states. He is also one of the curators of Auschwitz: Not long ago, not far away.

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Exhibition Videos

Auschwitz: Making Of An Exhibition. An Exclusive Conversation

Yom Hashoah

International Remembrance Day

In the Press

Opens June 2021

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